JULY 3, 2020: We are accepting non-Weber recones again!
please visit our recone link  

Hello...

It looks like you are visiting our site on a browser that is really old. Unfortunately, this means you can't get the full experience. It'd be awesome if you could upgrade to a modern browser, especially Chrome and Firefox as that is the best out there right now.

Copyright 2014. All Rights Reserved.

What's In A Name - What do all the letters mean?

All right, we admit it - the way we name our speakers can be kind of confusing. We will provide some explanations to help you decipher what everything means.

First of all, we use two main types of magnets: AlNiCo and Ceramic. In a nutshell:  AlNiCo = smooth, compressed and fattened at higher volumes, less headroom. Ceramic = punchy, dynamic, a little louder, more clean headroom. Click here for an article that will give you some more detail.

AlNiCo is designated by the letter A (pretty straightforward) and Ceramic is designated by the letter (not as straightforward). Our ceramic magnets are made of Strontium Ferrite, so that's where the F comes from.

 


 

SIGNATURE SERIES

Some of these have an S and some don't. What's the difference?

Signature 6/8/10/12 - smooth cone for early breakup, low detail, low headroom, crunchy
Signature 6S/8S/10S/12S - ribbed cone for later smoother breakup, higher detail, higher headroom



 

VINTAGE SERIES

This line of speakers is much bigger, and the names need more help to decipher. Here is how the Vintage Series differs from the Signature Series -- Our Vintage Series speakers use tighter, more concentric voice coil gaps, and lower carbon, machined steel parts in the magnet circuits which yield a stronger, more controlled tone at all volumes, particularly in the low end at high volumes. Our Signature Series uses all industry standard parts like all the rest of the speakers on the market and is an economical choice as a replacement speaker for low to moderate volume use. 

The Vintage Series names work like this:
[speaker size] • [magnet type] • [voice coil diameter] • [cone type] 

So for instance the 12A125A means [12" speaker] • [AlNiCo] • [1.25" voice coil] • [A-cone]
 
another example would be 15F150B, which means [15" speaker] • [Ceramic] • [1.50" voice coil] • [B-cone]


Cone Type explanations:

Not all letters are created equal - for example the T-cone (which stands for treble) means different things depending on the speaker size, and even the voice coil / magnet structure combination within the same speaker size. Here is what it all means
 
 
8" speakers:
 • 8A100 - no letter -  smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 8A100T - ribbed cone for later breakup and more articulation

 • 8[A/F]125 - no letter partially ribbed cone for the most middle-of-the-road and versatile tone
 • 8[A/F]125-O - "original" style smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 8[A/F]125-T -  multi-ribbed cone for the most articulation and headroom
 
 • 8[A/F]150 - no letter - uses that same T-cone just listed above for the 8A125 to help try to balance out how bassy this speaker is (though it still ends up being very dark)
 

 
10" speakers
 • 10A100 - no letter - smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 10A100T - ribbed cone for later breakup and more articulation
 
 • 10[A/F]125 - no letterinverted-rib seamed cone for authentic articulate vintage tone
 • 10[A/F]125-O -  "original", as in the original cone used by Jensen in the early 50's. smooth straight cone, no ribs, and therefore no resistance to breakup. very early crunchy breakup, "cheap" speaker tone, very little definition. good for greasy blues.
 • 10[A/F]125P - "pup", as in the same cone that is used on our Blue Pup. bright and chimey, mix of american and british sounds, though decidedly more british. high headroom.
 • 10[A/F]125H -  hemp cone, very soft material, darker, warmer, foggy and less focused. Hemp's longer fibers give treble notes a sub-harmonic richness that warms the sound. great for that hazy stoner metal thing where articulation isn’t the objective. it cuts the treble, but it also affects the overall response and feel to be more squishy.
 
 • 10[A/F]150 - no letterpunchy, warm, has a nice balance between low and high (low end is strong) and is a very general-purpose cone
 • 10[A/F]150-O - "original" style smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 10[A/F]150P - "pup", as in the same cone that is used on our Blue Pup. bright and chimey, mix of american and british sounds, though decidedly more british. high headroom.
 • 10[A/F]150H - hemp cone, very soft material, darker, warmer, foggy and less focused. Hemp's longer fibers give treble notes a sub-harmonic richness that warms the sound. great for that hazy stoner metal thing where articulation isn’t the objective. it cuts the treble, but it also affects the overall response and feel to be more squishy.
 • 10[A/F]150T - accentuates treble and headroom. adds articulation. (this is the same cone as the standard 10A125)
 

 
 
12" speakers
 • 12A100 - no letter - smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 12A100T - ribbed cone for later breakup and more articulation
 
 • 12[A/F]125 - no lettermulti-ribbed seamed cone for high articulation and headroom with accented treble
 • 12[A/F]125-O -  "original", as in the original cone used by Jensen in the early 50's. smooth straight cone, no ribs, and therefore no resistance to breakup. very early crunchy breakup, "cheap" speaker tone, very little definition. good for greasy blues.
 • 12[A/F]125A - thinner, curved-seam inverted-rib cone similar to those in the late 50s early 60s. woody, reedy tone. moderate breakup.
 • 12[A/F]125S - early to mid 60's cone. moderate breakup, good moderate tone. (this is different from the S in the Signature Series)
 • 12[A/F]125H -  hemp cone, very soft material, darker, warmer, foggy and less focused. Hemp's longer fibers give treble notes a sub-harmonic richness that warms the sound. great for that hazy stoner metal thing where articulation isn’t the objective. it cuts the treble, but it also affects the overall response and feel to be more squishy.
 
 • 12[A/F]150 - no letterStandard (we call this the “N”) cone: mid-60’s cone with a traditional scooped-mid Fender Blackface type tone
 • 12[A/F]150B - "British", ribbed cone with upper mid clarity and chime
 • 12[A/F]150H - hemp cone, very soft material, darker, warmer, foggy and less focused. Hemp's longer fibers give treble notes a sub-harmonic richness that warms the sound. great for that hazy stoner metal thing where articulation isn’t the objective. it cuts the treble, but it also affects the overall response and feel to be more squishy.
 • 12[A/F]150T - accentuates treble and headroom. adds articulation. (this is the same cone as the standard 12A125)
 • 12[A/F]150S - early to mid 60's cone. moderate breakup, good moderate tone. (this is different from the S in the Signature Series)
 • 12[A/F]150W - twangy mix of american and british tones. 
 • 12A150A -  thinner, curved-seam inverted-rib cone similar to those in the late 50s early 60s. woody, reedy tone. moderate breakup.
 

 
15" Speakers
 • 15A100 - no letter - smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 15A100A -  thinner, curved-seam inverted-rib cone similar to those in the late 50s early 60s. woody, reedy tone. moderate breakup.
 
 • 15[A/F]125 - no letter - smooth cone for early breakup and low detail
 • 15[A/F]125A -  thinner, curved-seam inverted-rib cone similar to those in the late 50s early 60s. woody, reedy tone. moderate breakup.
 
 • 15[A/F]150 - no letter - mid-60’s cone with a traditional scooped-mid Fender Blackface type tone
 • 15[A/F]150A - thinner, curved-seam inverted-rib cone similar to those in the late 50s early 60s. woody, reedy tone. moderate breakup.
 • 15[A/F]150B - "British" ribbed cone for upper mid emphasis (this is the area where a lot of 15's have a weird frequency notch, but this cone helps remedy that) also breaks up just a little quicker than the standard cone
 • 15[A/F]150-O - "original" style smooth cone for early breakup and low detail

 • 15[A/F]200 - this is the only speaker to use the "LL" cone, specifically designed to replicate the cone used in the Leslie 122 for the woofer
 
 
 
This should cover it, and hopefully make things a little clearer for you (or it might make you wonder why the same letters are used on different speakers when they mean different things. We can't say we blame you, but these names were made many years ago by Ted himself and have been in circulation for a long time. We aren't going to change them now, and cause even more confusion!)
 
If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to email us for more info.